STAATLICH BEFUGTER UND BEEIDETER ZIVILTECHNIKER (A)
RIBA, Royal Institute of British Architects (UK)

Mariahilferstrasse 31 , A- 1060 Vienna, Austria.
www.wunderkammer-architects.com
Tel:  ++43-19571962   Fax:  ++43-19571963
architect@nassar.at 

 

We believe, Architects, not politicians, must lay the basis for the solution of world problems
 

 

What makes Wunderkammer architects unique for your Projects ?
Wunderkammer architects is a full-service architectural firm specializing in real estate, facility, and workplace strategies. Since our founding we have completed a larg number of office and hotel spaces. mainly related to corporate projects and professional service firms.We think it is the combination of our commitment to superior design, planning, and service, Our success results from hard work, sensitivity to our clients and the environment, attention to detail, and the unwavering determination of all members of the Wunderkammer architects organization. We have always focused on quality work, long-term continuity, and steady growth.We work closely with our clients to learn about their business in order to support their strategic plans, improve productivity and business performance and help achieve their goals and dreams. Exceeding clients’ expectations demands a proactive, hands-on approach, which is the cornerstone of our success. It also demands new ideas.Design is the process of generating solutions to problems. Planning is the process of exploring and defining the problem. We provide planning solutions for what are essentially dynamic problems − people, relationships, work flow, communication. Good design results in space that is organized and equipped for the work people do. It is practical, using available space efficiently. It takes advantage of the building’s potential and compensates for its limitations. It is efficient, giving people the tools for productive activity. It is dynamic, providing for effective communication and working relationships. It is personal as well as functional,reflecting the company’s special personality and recognizing the user’s specific needs. It is flexible, providing for changes within the organization.
Our design approach is based on the following principles:
We create places for people. We want our work to not only satisfy functional requirements, but also contribute to the human spirit.
_ We are participatory designers. We form strong team relationships with clients, contractors, and our fellow professionals. _We draw the best from each, in order to address the unique characteristics of each project we undertake.
_ We build enduring relationships based on integrity and respect.
_ We plan for change. We realize that our work must serve the evolving needs of your organization and your people.
_ We are a “can-do” organization. We are creative in responding to the unexpected.
_ We see problems as opportunities for creativity.
_ We formulate clear ideas and strategies from complex and disjointed issues.
_ We value our time and our clients’ time. We manage our work and our interaction with eachother with a clear respect for the cost of our time to our clients.Our work adds value beyond the cost of our services. We create this value by carefully selecting the materials and systems that achieve project goals at the lowest cost and by
_ enhancing our clients’ business performance. We try to achieve unique design solutions that deliver the highest value for each client Euro.
As individuals, we take personal responsibility for the quality of our work. We don’t delegate the quest for quality. We build on and strive to exceed the body of work that has gone before.The success of our work depends on the mutual trust and respect of our team members and our clients. Trust is born of honesty, the willingness to speak the truth and the strength to accept it. Fundamental to the quality of our work is the quality of our clients. Those who demand great work inspire us to achieve great work. We look for clients who demand exceptional levels of performance. The quality of our work in turn attracts the most talented professionals to our firm.
Wunderkammer architects can offers services in the following areas:Architectural Design
Art Consultation
Building Analysis
Construction Administration Construction Documentation Design Standards Development Feasibility StudiesGraphic Design
Interior Architectural Design Master Planning
Space Planning
Renovation
Tenant Development
Urban Planning
Facility Strategies & Planning Real Estate Strategies Workplace Strategies

 

Architect

 

 

 

 

 
 
Architect. Dipl. Ing., RIBA, ZT    Wesam Nassar
 
Member of :
ZT         Federal Chamber section Architects     Vienna, Austria
ARB     Architects Registration Board                     London, UK
RIBA Royal Institute of British Architects            London, UK
Date of birth:    1969
Education …………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………
Bs. + Masters of Architecture
2003             Postgraduate:AA-DRL PH-1
(Design research Lab. In the Architecture association, London)     London, UK
2002             Chevening from the British Council      AA, London, UK
2002             RIBA Professional Architect License in UK      ARB, RIBA, UK
2001             Ziviltechniker Arch. Professional Architect License in Austria        ZT-Arch. Austria
2000             Architectural studies at Gensler , DC, AIA, Associate        Washington DC, USA
1994             Dipl. Ing. in Architecture at Leopold-Franzens University        Innsbruck, Austria
Professional experience…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………
2004-to Present Own Firm “Wunderkammer Architects”    www.wunderkammer-architects.com   Vienna, Austria          
2002-2004    Architect / manager at Serda Architects       Vienna, Austria
2000-2002   Project Architect/ manager at ATP,   www.atp.ac.at   Innsbruck, Austria
1999-2000   Project architect / designer at GENSLER   www.gensler.com   Washington DC, USA
1998-1999    Project architect at SIZELER ARCHITECTS   www.sizeler.com   New Orleans, USA
1994-1998    Architect at the Planungsbüro AOE,   Innsbruck, Austria
1993-1994    Architekturbüro Peter und Lanziener  Innsbruck, Austria      
1991-1992    Peter Lorenz, Architects     Innsbruck, Austria
Project work so far include schools, housing projects, green architecture, hospitals/pharmacies, university centers, office buildings, bank branches, shopping centers, technology parks, sport and recreation / community facilities, interior design (Gensler Architects, US), and a large number of International architectural competitions.
Publications……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….
Architectural Competition world wide
School center in Welsberg, Architectural Competition , Italy     Wettbewerbe / 241
Design research in responsive Environments     Inside-lines, Austria
Self-organization the way from born to made    AA London.
Grid-work to Network    AA London
Art exhibition in Innsbruck    TT, Innsbruck
Haiti Reconstruction Projekts      Caritas, ORF 
Interests and Art …………………………………………………………………………………………………………….…
I would describe myself as a cosmopolite: born in Egypt, studied and worked in Spain, Austria, US, and UK. I speak German, Arabic and English fluently and have fair knowledge of French and Spanish. I am an ambitious and determined person and fond of Arts and architecture. My main interests are Urban and sustainable architecture, green architectural design, photography, contemporary art, painting, traveling, cultures and languages.
 
 Art by Wesam Nassar

 

Q.  What exactly is the definition of the word Wunderkammer?
A. Wunderkammer is the German word for a “wonder-room.”
The classic style of a Wunderkammer, emerged in the sixteenth century, although more rudimentary collections had existed earlier. The Kunstkammer of Rudolf II, Holy Roman Emperor Rudolf II, (ruled 1576-1612), housed in the Hradschin at Prague was unrivalled north of the Alps provided a solace and retreat for contemplation that also served to demonstrate his imperial magnificence and power in symbolic arrangement of their display, ceremoniously presented to visiting diplomats and magnates.
During this time, “cabinets” which actually were large rooms of art ,artifacts and curiousities were limited to those who could afford to create and maintain them. Many monarchs, in particular, developed impressive collections.  A rather under-used example, stronger in art than other areas, was the Studiolo of Francesco I, the first Medici Grand-Duke of Tuscany. Frederick III of Denmark, who added Worm’s collection to his own after Worm’s death, was another such monarch.  A third example is the Kunstkamera founded by Peter the Great in Saint Petersburg in 1727.  Many items were bought in Amsterdam from Albertus Seba and Frederik Ruysch. The fabulous Habsburg Imperial collection, included important Aztec artifacts, including the feather head-dress or crown of Montezuma now in the Museum of Ethnology, Vienna.
Similar collections on a smaller scale were the complex Kunstschränke produced in the early 17th century by the Augsburg merchant, diplomat and collector Philipp Hainhofer. These were cabinets in the sense of pieces of furniture, made from all imaginable exotic and expensive materials and filled with contents and ornamental details intended to reflect the entire cosmos on a miniature scale. The best preserved example is the one given by the city of Augsburg to King Gustavus Adolphus of Sweden in 1632, which is kept in the Museum Gustavianum in Uppsala.
In 17th-century parlance, both French and English, a cabinet came to signify a collection of works of art, which might still also include an assembly objects of virtù or curiosities, such as a virtuoso would find intellectually stimulating. In 1714, Michael Bernhard Valentini published an early museological work, Museum Museorum, an account of the cabinets known to him with catalogues of their contents.

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